Author Archives: EJC

Piloting Promise Tracker In Sao Paulo

February 5th, 2015 | by EJC

Over the past year, the MIT Center for Civic Media has been developing and testing Promise Tracker, a citizen monitoring platform that allows communities to track local infrastructure projects and hold elected leaders accountable for political promises. Emilie Reiser reports on recent workshops run in Brazil, which helped the Center streamline the process of running a local monitoring campaign - from selecting an issue and designing a survey, to collecting data in the field and visualizing the results


Muslim Women In South Thailand Empowered To Develop Their Own Citizen News Reports

January 30th, 2015 | by EJC

Thai PBS conducts training and workshops for citizens in various regions of Thailand to train them on the basics of broadcasting journalism and give marginalised communities the opportunity to have their voices heard. Recently, a group of Muslim women aged between 30 and 60 years old attended the training and Angelique Reid from UNDP Thailand reports on their results


Ethical Storytelling: Lessons From The Border Lives Project

January 28th, 2015 | by EJC

Border Lives is a storytelling project that successfully utilized ethical storytelling principles to capture the experiences of people living along the border region of Northern Ireland, home to one of the most deeply entrenched conflicts in western European history. Border Lives’ Project Manager Conor Mc Gale shares the project’s process for ethical storytelling


Journalists Grapple With Complexities Of Covering Slavery

January 7th, 2015 | by EJC

More people are trapped – abused or tortured might be better words – in slavery today than ever in history. And yet, even as more governments pass legislation to tackle the scourge, and charities scramble for funds to enter the anti-trafficking fray, reporting on slavery is mired in misinformation and misconception


‘Why Won’t The War Stop?’ Sudanese Refugees In Their Own Words

December 29th, 2014 | by EJC

When students at the Ajuong Thok Refugee Camp in South Sudan first held the smart phones given to them by a UN Refugee Agency project, they didn't know how to turn them on. But, after a two month course in digital storytelling, they used them to tell local stories about life in the camp



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