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Published on June 6th, 2014 | by EJC

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Got TweetCred? Use It To Automatically Identify Credible Tweets

This article was written by Patrick Meier and originally published at iRevolution on 28 April, 2014. Republished with permission.

Update: Users have created an astounding one million+ tags over the past few weeks, which will help increase the accuracy of TweetCred in coming months as we use these tags to further train our machine learning classifiers. We will be releasing our Firefox plugin in the next few days. In the meantime, we have just released our paper on TweetCred which describes our methodology & classifiers in more detail.

What if there were a way to automatically identify credible tweets during major events like disasters? Sounds rather far-fetched, right? Think again.

The new field of Digital Information Forensics is increasingly making use of Big Data analytics and techniques from artificial intelligence like machine learning to automatically verify social media. This is how my QCRI colleague ChaTo et al. already predicted both credible and non-credible tweets generated after the Chile Earthquake (with an accuracy of 86%). Meanwhile, my colleagues Aditi, et al. from IIIT Delhi also used machine learning to automatically rank the credibility of some 35 million tweets generated during a dozen major international events such as the UK Riots and the Libya Crisis. So we teamed up with Aditi et al. to turn those academic findings into TweetCred, a free app that identifies credible tweets automatically.

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We’ve just launched the very first version of TweetCred—key word being first. This means that our new app is still experimental. On the plus side, since TweetCred is powered by machine learning, it will become increasingly accurate over time as more users make use of the app and “teach” it the difference between credible and non-credible tweets. Teaching TweetCred is as simple as a click of the mouse. Take the tweet below, for example.

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TweetCred scores each tweet based based on a 7-point system, the higher the number of blue dots, the more credible the content of the tweet is likely to be. Note that a TweetCred score also takes into account any pictures or videos included in a tweet along with the reputation and popularity of the Twitter user. Naturally, TweetCred won’t always get it right, which is where the teaching and machine learning come in. The above tweet from the American Red Cross is more credible than three dots would suggest. So you simply hover your mouse over the blue dots and click on the “thumbs down” icon to tell TweetCred it got that tweet wrong. The app will then ask you to tag the correct level of credibility for that tweet is.

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That’s all there is to it. As noted above, this is just the first version of TweetCred. The more all of us use (and teach) the app, the more accurate it will be. So please try it out and spread the word. You can download the Chrome Extension for TweetCred here. If you don’t use Chrome, you can still use the browser version here although the latter has less functionality. We very much welcome any feedback you may have, so simply post feedback in the comments section below. Keep in mind that TweetCred is specifically designed to rate the credibility of disaster/crisis related tweets rather than any random topic on Twitter.

As I note in my book Digital Humanitarians (forthcoming), empirical studies have shown that we’re less likely to spread rumors on Twitter if false tweets are publicly identified by Twitter users as being non-credible. In fact, these studies show that such public exposure increases the number of Twitter users who then seek to stop the spread of said of rumor-related tweets by 150%. But, it makes a big difference whether one sees the rumors first or the tweets dismissing said rumors first. So my hope is that TweetCred will help accelerate Twitter’s self-correcting behavior by automatically identifying credible tweets while countering rumor-related tweets in real-time.

This project is a joint collaboration between IIIT and QCRI. Big thanks to Aditi and team for their heavy lifting on the coding of TweetCred. If the experiments go well, my QCRI colleagues and I may integrate TweetCred within our AIDR (Artificial Intelligence for Disaster Response) and Verily platforms.

About the Author:

Patrick Meier (PhD) is an internationally recognized thought leader on the application of new technologies for crisis early warning, humanitarian response and resilience. Presently serves as Director of Social Innovation at the Qatar Foundation’s Computing Research Institute. Previously co-directed Harvard’s Program on Crisis Mapping & Early Warning and served as Director of Crisis Mapping at Ushahidi. Patrick holds a PhD from The Fletcher School, a Pre-Doctoral Fellowship from Stanford & MA from Columbia. He was born & raised in Africa. Follow on Twitter: @patrickmeier

Photo: mkhmarketing

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