Browsing the "Ethics" Tag

Think Again: Somaliland And The Trouble With A Free Press

May 6th, 2015 | by EJC

The self-declared Republic of Somaliland, otherwise a veritable beacon of democracy and good governance in the Horn of Africa, is often criticised for its attitude to the media. Illegal arrests and detentions of journalists and editors are common; but maybe things aren’t as bad as they seem


The War Photo No One Would Publish

February 13th, 2015 | by EJC

When Kenneth Jarecke photographed an Iraqi man burned alive, he thought it would change the way Americans saw the Gulf War. But the media wouldn’t run the picture


Humanity In The News: An Italian Case Study On How To Tell The Migrant Story

December 12th, 2014 | by EJC

One of the toughest tests of ethical journalism in Europe is the tragic story of migration involving thousands of poverty-stricken men, women and children from Africa and the Middle East – many of them fugitives from war – who risk their lives to make a perilous sea crossing in search of sanctuary on the shores of Italy and Spain


Framing The Ebola Epidemic

October 16th, 2014 | by EJC

Why do news outlets typically choose to emphasize the sensational worst-case scenario? Owen Schaefer examines the construction of headlines reporting on the Ebola epidemic.


The Ethics Of Sensor Journalism: Community, Privacy, And Control

October 13th, 2014 | by EJC

Revelations about both commercial tracking and government surveillance have sparked a contentious national debate about our fundamental rights regarding privacy and security. Meanwhile, community participation in the journalism process has blurred the lines between news professionals and the audience. It is into this public uncertainty and ambiguity that sensor journalism emerges


Questioning, Not Answering: Photo-Journalism

June 23rd, 2014 | by EJC

If anything newsworthy happens at a remote location, the photos used are mostly taken by local correspondents. Sailendra Kharel examines photojournalism in Nepal and its role in the storytelling process.



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