Browsing the "Photojournalism" Tag

No More Flies In Their Eyes?

August 7th, 2015 | by EJC

How do the photos used by development organisations affect perceptions of international development? How do agencies ensure that images preserve their subjects’ dignity? Has social media created new opportunities for self-representation, or just reinforced the use of outdated visual clichés


How Photographer Agnes Montanari Is Helping Children Deal With Trauma

March 19th, 2015 | by EJC

Photographer Agnes Montanari has been working with Syrian child refugees in Jordan in hopes of showing them that their lives don’t have to be defined by trauma. Mallary Jean Tenore talked with Montanari about her work and media can be a force for good in emergency settings


The War Photo No One Would Publish

February 13th, 2015 | by EJC

When Kenneth Jarecke photographed an Iraqi man burned alive, he thought it would change the way Americans saw the Gulf War. But the media wouldn’t run the picture


Journalists Grapple With Complexities Of Covering Slavery

January 7th, 2015 | by EJC

More people are trapped – abused or tortured might be better words – in slavery today than ever in history. And yet, even as more governments pass legislation to tackle the scourge, and charities scramble for funds to enter the anti-trafficking fray, reporting on slavery is mired in misinformation and misconception


‘Why Won’t The War Stop?’ Sudanese Refugees In Their Own Words

December 29th, 2014 | by EJC

When students at the Ajuong Thok Refugee Camp in South Sudan first held the smart phones given to them by a UN Refugee Agency project, they didn't know how to turn them on. But, after a two month course in digital storytelling, they used them to tell local stories about life in the camp


Questioning, Not Answering: Photo-Journalism

June 23rd, 2014 | by EJC

If anything newsworthy happens at a remote location, the photos used are mostly taken by local correspondents. Sailendra Kharel examines photojournalism in Nepal and its role in the storytelling process.



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