Browsing the "SMS" Tag

4 Low-Tech Solutions For Communications In Emergencies

August 28th, 2015 | by EJC

Innovation, in the humanitarian realm, is about finding sustainable and dignified solutions to the most pressing issues that affect the wellbeing of people affected by conflict, man-made or natural disasters, diseases, and food insecurity. However, in rapid-onset or complex emergencies, some of the infrastructure that is needed to implement ‘high-tech’ solutions is non-existent.


How To Counter Rumors And Prevent Violence Using UAVs

March 9th, 2015 | by EJC

Misinformation in Kenya's Tana Delta has played a significant role in causing fear, distrust and hatred between communities. Patrick Meier looks at how The Sentinel Project is using UAVs to dispel misleading rumours and prevent violence


‘Disruptive’ Mobile Plays Well With ‘Older’ Radio

December 16th, 2014 | by EJC

Many of us in developed countries find it annoying when somebody calls and hangs up before you can answer. But in developing countries, “missed calls” are becoming an extremely cost-effective cue for transmitting and obtaining information—without incurring fees for voice calls or text messages


Establishing Social Media Hashtag Standards For Disaster Response

November 24th, 2014 | by EJC

While information scarcity has long characterized our information landscapes, today’s information-scapes are increasingly marked by an overflow of information—Big Data. To this end, encouraging the proactive standardization of hashtags may be one way to reduce this Big Data challenge


Monitorial Citizenship: Projects And Tools

August 26th, 2014 | by EJC

Election monitoring projects have been successful in policing blatant election fraud through citizen and third-party election monitoring, but the outcomes of these elections are not always closely related to a politician’s performance. The MIT Center for Civic Media looks at ways to extend monitoring activities beyond election cycles, using it as a tool for ongoing feedback and dialogue between elected officials and their constituents



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