Browsing the "social media" Tag

Social Media For Disaster Response – Done Right!

July 29th, 2015 | by EJC

To say that Indonesia’s capital is prone to flooding would be an understatement. Well over 40% of Jakarta is at or below sea level. Add to this a rapidly growing population of over 10 million and you have a recipe for recurring disasters. But Jakarta is also flooded with information during disasters. Patrick Meier looks at how Indonesians sort fact from fiction


Maintaining Media Standards Amidst Change

July 15th, 2015 | by EJC

In Indonesia, the media is controlled only by a few people, and the involvement of media owners in political parties undercuts the credibility of journalists. Leading up to the 2014 general elections, the Aliansi Jurnalis Independen expressed its concerns


Fidel Is Dead? Long Live Fidel?

June 17th, 2015 | by EJC

Fidel Castro is no stranger to death rumours. On January 9th 2015, Twitter was awash with such gossip once again - and the claims continued to spread even after larger media organisations had already dispelled the rumours. But how exactly did the rumours start? MO* reconstructs the rumour mill in this “making off”


New Media Could Topple ‘Helicopter Journalism’ In Africa

May 28th, 2015 | by EJC

In a panel discussion held at the 15th International Journalism Festival in Perugia, Italy, journalist Tolu Ogunlesi from Nigeria used the term 'helicopter journalism' to describe the way Western media often approach and represent the developing world. Lou Del Bello explains what this term means and how new media is helping to combat it


How To Live-Tweet A Dangerous Police Standoff

May 8th, 2015 | by EJC

Armed with an iPhone, content creation apps, and social media, a reporter is able to provide a vivid picture of a SWAT standoff to a huge audience within seconds, but those modern tools need to be tempered with old-school journalistic judgment and restraint


Engaging The Public In The Budget: Twitter Chats In Kenya

March 17th, 2015 | by EJC

Debates on budgetary matters can be quite technical and difficult for laypeople to understand. IBP Kenya experimented with Twitter to see if it could make the topic more accessible for audiences. Vivian Magero and John Kinuthia outline their results



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